Guest Post: Trial by Jury

Here’s a timely guest post by Ian Chesterman – thanks Ian!

The debate around what to do with Victoria street has gone along typical lines, with the pro-biking/walking/public transport group predicting their preferred solution will usher in a utopian future, while the pro-car group is insisting that same solution would lead to an apocalyptic traffic disaster.

The problem is, no-one can say for sure what impact any given solution will have. Computer traffic modelling can help, studies of similar situations in other cities can help, but nothing is certain until tried on the ground.

And this leads to the point of this post – why not try it? Specifically, why not run a trial? Trials are not a new idea for assessing the potential impacts of roading changes. Queenstown has just finished a 7-month trial on pedestrianising Upper Beach St, and is currently considering making it permanent after more than 80% of businesses supported the change. Picton trialled removing several car parking spaces along the waterfront and converting them to outside seating; that has now become permanent. Auckland trialled allowing taxis to share Grafton bridge, previously reserved for buses and bikes; the trial was abandoned early after it was found the taxis failed to adhere to the restrictions. Paris is about to start a trial pedestrianising 3km of highway along the bank of the Seine for six months.

This trial to replace car parking with pedestrian space in Picton is about to become permanent

This trial to replace car parking with pedestrian space in Picton is about to become permanent

Because all of these were or are trials with a set time limit, with the possibility of change during the trial and public consultation during and after the trial, it is much easier to reassure doubters – “It’s only for X months, and if it doesn’t work we’ll put it back”. Unanimous support for any change is near impossible but a well-designed trial can convince a large majority, particularly if the trial includes collection of objective data.

Now is a good time to trial a people-focused fix for Victoria street: spring, coming in to summer, is ideal to see if people take to walking, cycling and dining outside. A trial could be done cheaply, as it would only need a few bollards and signs, some paint, reprogram a few traffic lights and a decent period of time to assess the impacts.

New York got a lot of trialling done quickly with paint and planters

New York got a lot of trialling done quickly with paint and planters

So come on Christchurch – why not give it a try?

Should we be doing more trialling of potentially contentious street treatments?

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7 Comments

  • Meltdblog
    16 September 2016, 3:27 pm

    Also the great success of "Eat Street" Rotorua:
    http://www.newzealand.com/int/article/eat-streat-restaurants-rotorua/
    It ties the lakefront pedestrian area further into the city, but they already had extensive kerbside parking so it was less contentious to remove some and create a pedestrian only area.

    REPLY
  • Cyclomaniac
    16 September 2016, 7:54 pm

    Thanks for posting this Ian! I think you hit the nail on the head here. There are so many scientific articles that point out that the majority people are not easily convinced by what would seem quite obvious rational arguments. A trial would allow us with transport solutions while gaining experience and doing no permanent harm. Seeing is believing!!

    REPLY
  • Observant
    19 September 2016, 9:08 am

    A great article offering sound sensible advice for a way forward. It will take lots of us to overcome the cultural, economic and institutional barriers to change in Christchurch.

    The old boys in Christchurch are used to having their way without compromise. They are certain in knowing what is best for them and resent the intrusion of others in decision making. Gerry’s rebuild plans catered to them while paying lip service to Share an Idea.

    To change things here is going to require people who cycle to write submissions regularly, at the very least. We can work for change, or accept more business as usual.

    REPLY
  • Criggie
    19 September 2016, 11:33 am

    Consider that Victoria Street is a mirror of Ferry Road, in terms of cartography. There isn’t a similar road into the four aves on the other two corners… Lincoln and Blenheim Roads stop at the Aves as do Cranford/Sherborne and Hills/Whitmore.

    Riccarton Road-> Ave, Victoria Street, Colombo Street, and Ferry Road are the three that pierce the four aves and drive in toward the CBD rather than being funnelled around the four Aves.

    Does that affect your viewpoint?

    REPLY
  • Criggie
    19 September 2016, 11:33 am

    Consider that Victoria Street is a mirror of Ferry Road, in terms of cartography. There isn’t a similar road into the four aves on the other two corners… Lincoln and Blenheim Roads stop at the Aves as do Cranford/Sherborne and Hills/Whitmore.

    Riccarton Road-> Ave, Victoria Street, Colombo Street, and Ferry Road are the three that pierce the four aves and drive in toward the CBD rather than being funnelled around the four Aves.

    Does that affect your viewpoint?

    REPLY

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